Rental House Culture Allows the Rule of the Rich

Rental House Culture Allows the Rule of the Rich

Rental House Culture Allows the Rule of the Rich

Around the world, migration from rural areas to the capital has not only increased the latter's population density but has also resulted to a higher number of rental houses. Outskirts of business districts are packed with high-rise condominiums to accommodate the work force unable to commute from their original houses. Despite the high rent and the pride of living in the heart of the city, however, those who choose to rent rooms near their place of employment endure bad living conditions such as minimal fire-prevention measures, poor building maintenance or perhaps, sharing a narrow room with a number of other lesees.
On a positive note, rental houses give a lessee the freedom to choose his own short-term “home” that suits his taste and convenience - may it be distance, budget or environment. Without a long-term commitment to a property, he can move across cities or countries without much responsibility. He can choose a rental house with furnishings, too - saving him time and resources. There would be no land or property tax to pay yearly, either. On the other hand, this rental house culture also allows a hegemony of the rich.
In a developing country such as the Philippines, for example, basic wage earning employees from rural areas seeking better opportunities in the Metro are forced to rent houses or rooms and tolerate tough living conditions while rich land-owning corporations take advantage of this opportunity by imposing higher fees for rental houses, most especially in business districts. These eager workers from rural areas, despite receiving a decent income, are also burdened with rental house fees and utilities. The culture of rental houses only widens the gap between the rich and the poor and thus, worsens poverty in developing countries.
Additionally, instances of rental houses do not only happen in the capital. Families who own land in rural areas but who chose to flee to the capital for better economic opportunities rent out houses and properties they leave behind. In an ironic sense, they rent houses in the capital but rent out their own houses.

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